Connect with:
Wednesday, November 20, 2019
HomeNews & StoriesEmerson Helping to Build Pipeline to Hollywood for Underserved Students

Emerson Helping to Build Pipeline to Hollywood for Underserved Students

Emerson is working to build a more inclusive entertainment industry through an exciting new partnership with Howard University, the University of Southern California, and The Hollywood Reporter.

The Young Executives Fellowship Program looks to recruit talented students from underserved high schools in Los Angeles and prepare them for the college application process and beyond through mentoring, education, and internships. The ultimate goal is build a pipeline to increase diversity among Hollywood executives.

The College is participating in the program in two ways. The College will host a five-day Summer Boot Camp at Emerson Los Angeles where participating high school students will learn about how to get into college, setting and sustaining academic goals, effective communication, personal and financial wellness, and networking skills. Emerson also is offering a full scholarship worth over $300,000 to a student who goes through the program and is accepted into the College.

The two-year program kicks off with a three-week summer program run by the USC film school, and will offer the 20 participants individual mentors, SAT tutoring, paid internships with top media companies, and Macbook Airs donated by Twitter. Skydance Media is providing a $100,000 scholarship, and talent agency WME and Ari Emanuel have committed $250,000. Howard University also is offering a full scholarship to a participant.

At the Hollywood Reporter Empowerment Gala held April 30 in Hollywood, singer/actress Selena Gomez introduced the inaugural class of Young Executives Fellows. Media mogul Oprah Winfrey received the Empowerment Award, “which celebrates agents of change who are breaking down barriers for people of color, women, the LGBTQ community, and other emerging voices in Hollywood,” according to the Hollywood Reporter.

The Fellowship sprang from discussions between Hollywood Reporter editorial executives and among entertainment companies such as WME and Amazon Studios about how to make sure the entertainment industry better reflects its audience, according to THR.